January 7.2015 – Story Behind “Colder Weather” by the Zac Brown Band

colder_weather-_zac_brown_band-246015

Hear the story here!

* Personally, and in my opinion, which wont even get you a cup o’ joe, I think this is one of the
best Zac Brown Band records out there. There’s a tie for me, with “Highway 40 Ride”, which is
also amazing!
This song makes me think it is a modern-day version of David Loggin’s “Please Come To Boston.”
I cannot even begin to imagine a touring artist’s life. They have very little time in their
homes and it has to take a major toll on all relationships.
Anyway, this is well written and so compelling to listen to. Enjoy! ~ Robynn

“Colder Weather” is the second single from Zac Brown Band’s 2010 album, You Get What You Give. The song was written by lead singer Zac Brown, his usual songwriting partner Wyatt Durrette, the band’s keyboardist and guitarist Coy Bowles and Georgia singer-songwriter Levi Lowrey, who has performed as supporting act for the band and featured on many their projects.

Wyatt Durrette told the story behind the song in an interview with The Boot: “There was a girl I was seeing, who lived in Kansas City. We really liked each other, but geography and timing just wasn’t working for us. She was getting pretty frustrated with the whole thing and wanted me to slow down, as far as traveling so much and all those things. I wasn’t willing to do that because we were just getting started, and I’m chasing my dreams.

I was going to see her. We were in Green Bay, Wisconsin playing a show with Little Big Town, and it was pouring down snow. We were supposed to go to Kansas City the next day for some radio thing, but the radio people canceled. Instead, we just went on to wherever we were going next. I had to call her and tell her that I wasn’t going to make it. She was not a happy camper. She let me have it. I hung up the phone, walked on the bus and wrote the chorus and the melody to the chorus.

Me and Zac worked on the first chorus together. I knew the song was special. You can just tell as a writer when you’ve written something that has a chance to be big or special. I knew that one was.

I sat on the song for six months after that. I did what I always do: sing it to the guys and say, ‘What do you think of this?’ And they’ll go, ‘Oh yeah, that’s great!’

Levi Lowrey is one of the best artists I know. He’s a poet. I felt like this song needed the way he wrote, so I invited Levi over to my house one night and we wrote the rest of the verses. It turned out great. It was so weird because that same night, Coy, our guitar player, stopped by. He was just coming by my house to say hey. He didn’t know we were writing. He sat down and was listening to us write the verses, and he said, ‘How about a bridge?’ He read one to us, and we were like, ‘Hell yeah! That’s perfect!’ [laughs] So we stuck that in there, and I brought all that to Zac. Zac and I finished writing the alternate chorus in the end.

That one’s special to all of us. It holds a spot because of what we do and being away and all those things. For those guys, I think that song rings on missing their family. That’s the beauty of art: everybody has their own take on what the song can mean. As for me, it’s a story of impossible love where geography or timing gets in the way of it, and it’s just not possible.”
The song climbed to the top of the Country chart in April 2011, giving the Zac Brown Band their fifth #1.

Buy the song by clicking here

LYRICS: Written by Zac Brown, Wyatt Durrette, Levi Lowrey and Coy Bowles

She’d trade Colorado if he’d take her with him
Closes the door before the winter lets the cold in,
And wonders if her love is strong enough to make him stay,
She’s answered by the tail lights shining through the window pane

[Chorus:]
He said I wanna see you again
But I’m stuck in colder weather
Maybe tomorrow will be better
Can I call you then?
She said you’re ramblin’ man
You ain’t ever gonna change
You got a gypsy soul to blame
And you were born for leavin’.

At a truck stop diner just outside of Lincoln,
The night is black as the coffee he was drinkin’,
And in the waitress’ eyes he sees the same ol’ light a-shinin’,
He thinks of Colorado and the girl he left behind him

[Chorus:]
He said I wanna see you again
But I’m stuck in colder weather
Maybe tomorrow will be better
Can I call you then?
She said you’re ramblin’ man
You ain’t ever gonna change
You got a gypsy soul to blame
And you were born for leavin’ (born for leavin’)

Well, it’s a winding road
When you’re in the lost and found
You’re a lover – I’m a runner
And we go ’round ‘n ’round
And I love you but I leave you
I don’t want you but I need you
You know it’s you who calls me back here, baby

Oh I wanna see you again
But I’m stuck in colder weather
Maybe tomorrow will be better
Can I call you then?
Cause I’m a ramblin’ man
I ain’t ever gonna change (I ain’t ever gonna change)
I got a gypsy soul to blame
And I was born for leavin’ (born for leavin’)

When I close my eyes I see you
No matter where I am
I can smell your perfume through these whispering pines
I’m with your ghost again
It’s a shame about the weather
But I know soon we’ll be together
And I can’t wait ’til then
I can’t wait ’til then

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About Robynn

Robynn Jaymes has spent her whole life in radio… 30 years!! And almost half of them have been at Star Country. Originally from Cincinnati, Robynn came to the area as a Liberty University student. Along with all things country music, Robynn is a big fan of Football!—The Virginia Tech Hokies, The Washington Redskins and, of course, the Cincinnati Bengals. And also, “I’m addicted to the Weather Channel,” she says. Right now, Robynn is a big fan if the music coming from Miranda Lambert, Lady Antebellum and Kenny Chesney! Robynn is also a winner of the Billboard Air Personality of the Year award. Hear all new Warm & Fuzzies with Robynn M-F at 11:45AM!

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